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Profetic Calaveras: Bringing Life Through Music

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By Johnny Griffith

The name is fittingly memorable as the music they create and isn’t what you’ll find on most stages in the area on any given weekend. The Durango, Colorado trio known as Profetic Calaveras (PC) originated right here in Tyler and has been using their music to spread positivity ever since. An intriguing blend of several different influences, PC combines cultures and musical philosophies for a set full of grooves which will leave you smiling and wanting more.

As they are headed back to East Texas for a show at Clicks Live on June 1st, we recently caught up to Profetic Calaveras to find out more about them.

Johnny: What is the current lineup of Profetic Calaveras?

Profetic Calaveras: Alex Ruiz on guitar and vocals, Carolina Ruiz on bass, and Gab Kaplan on drums.

Johnny: Who do you individually feel was most responsible for starting you down a musical path, and why?

Alex: My cousin, Emmanuel, was the person who got me to listen to a lot of bands that became really influential for me later in life. He was the first person to get me started on guitar. A lot of my family is musical; I feel like it has always been flowing in my blood.

Cali: In 2015, my brother-in-law had a dream and woke up saying that I was meant to be a bass player. After that he taught me some technique. With my sister as the drummer, me as the bass player, and him (Kendrick) as the guitarist, we started playing. I wrote my first, very basic, riff within a week or so; it took some direction and guidance but that became one of our first songs as a band.

Gab: My parents took me to see The Who (what was left of them anyway) before the age of 7. They always took me to shows and supported me playing music in school and with bands. From high school marching band to college ensembles to Drum Corps International, they were always there cheering me on. As for actually starting, my babysitter Michelle was the one who got me my first guitar.

Johnny: Who were some of your biggest early musical influences?

Alex: Jimi Hendrix, Under Oath, Mexican pop music, Christian radio. I was all over the place.

Cali: Some Brazilian music my parents loved like Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gilberto Gil, Gabriel Pensador, Seu Jorge, and Ana Carolina. And my main bass influence, Victor Wooten.

Gab: The Who, AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Metallica, Rush.

Johnny: When did the idea of PC begin to form?

Profetic Calaveras: After touring with Alex’s previous project called Star Steed, it felt like the music was starting to move in a different direction. All the members at that point begun to go their separate ways and Cali and Alex decided to create a project all their own.

Johnny: So what about that name? How did that originate and what’s the significance?

Profetic Calaveras: We brainstormed for a while. At one point Alex looked at the “Calavera” tattoo on his arm and said the name offhandedly. After that we decided that spiritually that meant a lot more to us. It reminded us of the scripture Ezekiel 37, where Ezekiel is taken to a field of dried bones in a vision and is asked to bring them to life with his words. He does this and raises an army. The band’s name to us basically means that we can bring life and color to people through our music, and its meaning celebrates the beauty of life. The Calaveras aspect is a nod to Alex’s Mexican heritage and the imagery that comes up with the Day of the Dead celebration.

Johnny: When and where was the first Profetic Calaveras show?

Profetic Calaveras: Technically, our first show was in NYC at a place called “The Shrine;” however, right before coming on stage one of Cali’s tuning pegs completely broke off. Needless to say the show didn’t go as planned and is probably one of the worst shows we ever played. So, our first official full band show was at ETX Brewing Company in Downtown Tyler. The line-up was Alex, Cali, Daniel Armstrong on melodica, and Eddie Farina on cajón.

Johnny: About how many shows a month does PC play these days?

Profetic Calaveras: We usually play 2-3 shows a month. We have been in a little bit of hiatus since moving to Durango and we are still trying to do some more recording to release our first album this fall, titled “The Road Ahead.”

Johnny: There is a very cool vibe to your music, a sort of laid back complexity. How would you describe your sound and how did that sound evolve as you started practicing and putting pieces together?

Profetic Calaveras: The sound is truly unique with us having difficulty to really pinpoint a specific “genre.” Sometimes we just tell people it’s like ‘Vulfpeck met Santana’ but there’s also so much more we like to sprinkle in. We like to think the band’s music is a mirror image of us as individuals, and that our differences and similarities form a cohesive unit. Lately, since Gab has joined the band, we’ve been really digging into a more progressive rock sound.

Johnny: What would you say the ratio of cover tunes to originals is?

Profetic Calaveras: Honestly, it’s about 80% original tunes to 20% covers. When we do covers, we really like to just make them our own, messing with different genres and time signatures.

Johnny: You originated in East Texas but are now based out of Durango, Colorado. What prompted the move and how has the reception been to the band up there?

Profetic Calaveras: Well, it started when we introduced a new member to the band, Zion Spencer. We booked a gig at the Venice Beach Bar in LA in September 2017, and were able to put together a West Coast tour that lasted about 3 months. Zion suggested we spend the winter in Durango, since he had lived here for 3 years and had family out here. When we finally got to Durango we fell in love with its chill mountain town vibe. It has been a privilege to grow roots here and call this place home. The reception to our music has been great; there is a thriving music scene there and they have welcomed us with open arms.

Johnny: Profetic Calaveras is playing a show at Clicks Live on June 1st. What brings PC back to East Texas for the show?

Profetic Calaveras: It’s actually a few reasons. We’ve wanted to show our newest member, Gab, our old stomping grounds, and the opportunity presented itself when we were asked to play our friend’s wedding in Denton. From there we decided to do a little mini-tour and go do the fun stuff in Texas — we’re calling it a “play-cation.”

Johnny: What is on the radar for the rest of 2019 and beyond?

Profetic Calaveras: We are planning some more dates around Colorado during the summer, and we’ll be releasing our first album “The Road Ahead” in the fall. 2019 is looking great!

Check out Profetic Calaveras at facebook.com/profeticcalaveras/ and profeticcalaveras.com.

Bands

Just The Way She Is: Elfin Paige

Elfin Paige Holding Her Guitar

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By Johnny Griffith

Some people are just blessed with what seems like an endless well of creativity, and there are the rest of us who have to work to get the ideas flowing. From the moment you meet Elfin Paige, you get this calm, laid-back evening breeze vibe that belies the creative hurricane going on inside her head, and for good reason … this single mom wears a lot of hats. She is a part time photographer and a writer, publishing two books already, with a third on the way in September, oh, and she’s a really good singer/songwriter who has found her way to many stages in the East Texas area already.

I ran across her recently while she was getting ready to play a show, and sat down to get to know her a little better. 

Johnny: You’re not originally from this area. Where were you born and what brought you out this way?

Elfin: I was born at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Stockton, California, but I grew up mostly in and around San Diego until my early teens, when my family moved to East Texas. Mom and dad decided to move back to Lindale when I was 13. So on Thanksgiving Day, 1994, we unloaded the U-Haul into that first rental house on FM 16. Mom and dad had been in a ministry called The Agape Force here in the 1970’s. At that time they were close friends with Keith Green, Winkie Pratney, and many other well known people in the local ministry circuit. They moved back to serve with Winkie in his ongoing ministry.

 Johnny: What do you feel was the biggest cultural adjustment when you came out this way?

Elfin: People burning things in their front yards and strangers waving from their cars.

 Johnny: What is your earliest memory of music?

Elfin: My parents are singer-songwriters, so all my life. There was never much money, but I grew up with mom and dad’s gold and platinum records hanging on our trailer house walls. I was in the recording studio for the first time at age 6. 

 Johnny: At what point did you take more than a passing interest and whom do you credit for fostering that spark?

Elfin: It was never NOT a thing. Like I mentioned, it was my family culture. At family get togethers you get together and sing Beach Boys songs with all the harmonies for fun.

 Johnny: When did you feel the desire to begin writing your own music as opposed to just playing other people’s stories?

Elfin:Well, I am, first and foremost, a writer. I was 8 years old the first time I wrote a song that was actually recorded and used for a kids project my parents were working on at the time.

 Johnny: What do you enjoy writing about the most, or do the songs just take a life of their own?

Elfin: I can do either/both. Sometimes I write out of necessity, as a way to process pain and emotion. But other times I’ve had a friend call me and ask, “Can you give me two songs for this children’s project about such and such,” and the next day I’m like, “Actually, here’s three.” 

 Johnny: You’re also creative in other outlets besides music. Do you find the different mediums influencing each other or blending together at times?

Elfin: Certainly it’s all intertwined. I am, I guess, what they would call “a creative.” So I can transition very easily from one medium to another. It’s less about being good at X, Y or Z, more about the way my brain works, I think. I am also very tenacious, so if I don’t do something creative excellently right at first, well we can’t have that, give me just a minute. 

Johnny: A big part of your outlet as a writer was inspired by your son. Can you tell us a little about that part of your life?

Elfin: My second to youngest of my 5 children, Trey, was born with severe health problems, and I spent the 3 years he was with us either in the hospital with him, or caring for him at home, while also doing all-the-things. When he passed, I started doing photography part time, and nannying a special needs little girl and her brother for several years. I also served as the children’s pastor, and one of the worship leaders at Bethesda Church, in Lindale. In 2017 my autobiographical book, “From Ashes,” about our many adventures, and life with (and then without) Trey, was released. That same year the first children’s book I co-authored with my friend, best selling thriller novelist Jennifer Jaynes, was also released. It’s called “I Care About Me.” Jennifer and I have been working together on a second kids book entitled “Just The Way I Am.” It’s set to drop in September. Additionally, I have been collecting interviews for a documentary project over the last few years. It’s about parents, and the aftermath of abortion. 

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 Johnny: What do you remember about the first show you ever played?

Elfin: So I’ve been singing all my life and I don’t really have a memory of the first time I did that publicly. Probably a play at church as a small child. I have zero nerves singing in public. But the first time I started playing my guitar publicly I was already in my thirties, and my palms would sweat every dang time for a solid year! 

Johnny: Do you typically play solo or do you ever collaborate with others on stage?

Elfin: Both. I have spent the bulk of my time as a singer backing up other people, singing harmonies, or being part of group acts. I am pretty adept at hearing what’s already there and knowing how to complement that without overpowering it or taking over. However, I’m a pretty strong lead vocalist, and I think I’ve become a little restless always being everybody’s backup girl. So I’m playing more on my own now. 

Johnny: Who would you say had the biggest impact musically on you?

Elfin: Being raised by creatives and songwriters has to count for something. But beyond that, I had a very eclectic set of music I was exposed to. As a kid I would pull CD’s from my dad’s collection and listen to The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Todd Rundgren, The Zombies, you name it. Mostly stuff that was before my time. But then I also listened to current stuff as I was growing up in the 80’s and 90’s. I’d take my boom box, lock myself in the bathroom, and practice hitting notes with Celine Dion and Mariah Carrey for hours on end when I was 12. As a teenager, my best friend loved country music, so I was introduced to that whole scene, but my favorites were the ones who were sort of mocked for not being “country enough,” like Faith Hill and Shania Twain. I don’t know if there are very many Shania songs I wouldn’t know every word to if you put them on.

Johnny: So that being said, how would you describe your sound/style? 

Elfin: That’s a good question, which I have asked myself on numerous occasions. I never quite know how to answer me, but I’ve begun saying Americana/Folk, for lack of a better description.

Johnny: About how many shows do try to play a month?

Elfin: As many as I can manage right now, since I don’t have a regular job to pay the bills.

Johnny: What’s coming up during the rest of the year that has you excited?

Elfin: It’s very cool the locals in the music scene have nominated me for best female vocalist in the upcoming ETX Music Awards in September. “Just The Way I Am” releasing the same month is also exciting! Beyond that I’m just sort of flying by the seat of my pants, waiting to see what the Lord will do, trusting, moving when I feel I’m supposed to, being still and trying not to panic when it doesn’t feel like things are happening like I’d hoped or thought they would.

Follow Elfin at facebook.com/elfinpaigemusic/.

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Bands

Making His Own Way: Jonathon Allen

Jonathon Allen Playing Guitar

 

By Johnny Griffith

Life isn’t exactly fair, and it certainly is full of challenges, pitfalls, and plenty of circumstances that can be used as excuses for failure or opportunities to rise above those challenges and use them as stepping stones to where you want to be. Local East Texas singer/songwriter Jonathon Allen has certainly had plenty of those challenges along the way, and has decided to use those moments as inspiration for songs he hopes will provide others the same opportunity. With raw, passionate, honest music that is a mirror reflection of his personality, Allen pulls no punches, makes no apologies for being that way, and bares his soul through the lyrics and soulful delivery of his songs on stages around the area. He stopped and gave us a chance to get to know him better this month:

Johnny: Where are you from originally?

Jonathon:I grew up moving between Gladewater, Texas and a small town in northern Michigan called Cheboygan. My dad’s from here and my mom’s family is from Cheboygan but I call East Texas home these days.

Johnny: What got you started in music?

Jonathon: Well, I grew up in a drug-ridden area and almost everyone I was related to was doing meth or heroin and they would never listen to the kids, you know. I had noticed when a good song came on they would always be like “listen to the words, listen to the meaning,” so I thought to myself “that’s how I can get through to them.” When I was 14 I wrote a song called “My Demons” about my parents’ drug abuse. I walk in their room and tell them I wrote this song, and it’s the usual “Shut up get out.” Well, I said fine don’t listen to it, but it’s about your drug habit, and at that time they thought I didn’t know about their habits. My dad came and listened to it and went and got my step mom who came and listened to it, and a few weeks after that they were off drugs and stayed clean for 6 years. At a point I thought to myself, “If I can help someone that far into addiction with music then imagine how many other people I could help get through it,” and that’s a big reason why music is my passion.

Johnny: Who were your early influences musically?

Jonathon: Definitely Pantera because that was the band that I always gravitated towards. Eventually I started to get more into Tool and Pink Floyd because of the lyrics. I was infatuated with the structure of the lyrics and how they could explain what message they were trying to get across in the most efficient way so it would make the biggest impact on the listener.

Johnny: When was the moment you felt that you could do this as more than just a hobby?

Jonathon: I always wanted to. When I started it was my goal to support myself with music only, and try to make it as far as I can possibly go. 

Johnny: You tend to do more rock than country during your shows. Was that just where you gravitated due to your personal preference in music or was it more of a conscious choice?

Jonathon: Yeah I’m more of a rock, heavy metal and blues guy. I like outlaw country but most of those country covers are the songs people wanna hear, and I’m a man of the people.

Johnny: What have been some of the biggest personal challenges in pursuing this as a career?

Jonathon: Honestly just building my name up. I lived in the woods for a while and started playing in front of Hastings in Longview and got myself out of the gutter by doing that, and shortly after Hastings shut down I met Donnie from the White Trash Wannabees and he helped me get my start in the local bar scene.

Johnny: What show has stuck out to you from what you’ve done so far?

Jonathon: Probably the show when I opened for Post Profit, They Were Giants, and To Whom It May. It was a pretty awesome show and the crowd was just awesome that night.

Johnny: Are you typically a one-man show or do you pair up with other musicians during live sets?

Jonathon: Most of the time it’s just me. Every once in a while someone will come up and jam with me but for the most part it’s just me, my voice, and a guitar.

Johnny: How many originals do you have? Do you have a favorite cover song you like to include in your sets?

Jonathon: I have about 13 originals that I still play. I have a lot more in the archives that I plan to reanimate. As far as covers go, I love playing “She Talks To Angels” by The Black Crowes. It’s just a fun song to play and people love it.

Johnny: If you could share the stage with any living artist, who would it be?

Jonathon: As of right now I would love to share the stage with A Perfect Circle, or Chevelle. I’ve been listening to those guys a lot lately and I love their sound .

Johnny: What kind of experience do you want people seeing your set live for the first time to go away with?

Jonathon: Well I love it when people don’t know who I am because my style is bluesy soul. I’m a powerhouse vocalist and it always catches their ears. I love when they aren’t paying attention and when I hit that right note they turn around and become a fan. Then they start listening to my originals, and they listen to the message because it’s important to me that people understand why I do this, and I think that’s what I want them to take away from it.

Johnny: Who do you listen to when you’re not learning a new cover or writing an original?

Jonathon: That’s a long list, but to shorten it; A Perfect Circle, Chevelle, Thy Art Is Murder, White Chapel, Otis Redding, Al Green, Sam Cooke and many more. I listen to a lot of different music. It just depends on what kind of day it is.

Keep track of upcoming Jonathon Allen shows at facebook.com/jonathon.allen.925.

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Bands

A Unified Musical Assault:  We Divide

We Divide on Stage

By Johnny Griffith

It’s an easy assumption to make, based on what tends to get the most stage time around this area, that the East Texas music scene is pretty homogenous. In addition to being an easy assumption, it would be an incorrect assumption as East Texas boasts a diverse group of musicians catering to an equally diverse group of music lovers in the region. For those out there who are fans of metal and metalcore, you have a new source to get your sonic fix: We Divide.

Formed in 2017, We Divide brings a heavy punch to the metalcore arena with musical precision and vocal pyrotechnics. The five piece band masquerades as normal nine to fivers while walking around town, but once they take the stage no one mistakes them for anything other than a bunch of talented musicians that can compete with anyone in the genre. 

They took some time to give us some more background on the band this month:

Johnny: So what is the current lineup of We Divide?

WD: Jacob Pyle – Vocals; Kelby Youngblood – Guitar; Michael Wooddell – Guitar; Jerod Blue – Bass Guitar; and Jordan Blue – Drums.

Johnny: Give us a brief synopsis of your individual musical backgrounds?

WD: Michael was heavily influenced by blues and classic rock such as Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Stevie Ray Vaughan; later on thrash and groove metal, but metalcore bands such as Killswitch Engage, As I Lay Dying, Bullet For My Valentine had the biggest influence on his writing style, with more recent influences being progressive bands such as After the Burial and Novelists.

Kelby was inspired early on by hair metal bands such as Motley Crue, Ratt, and Winger and is heavily influenced by virtuosos, melodic death metal, and metalcore. A lot of his lead work is inspired by guys like Steve Vai and Jeff Loomis. Writing influence comes heavily from Killswitch Engage, As I Lay Dying, Unearth, After the Burial, and Novelists.

Jacob is a huge metalcore/progressive metalcore fan as well. Phil Labonte (All That Remains), Garrett Russell (Silent Planet, and Anthony Notarmaso (After the Burial) are among his top vocal influences. Garrett Russell has been a big inspiration lately, especially in lyric writing.

Jordan gets a lot of musical inspiration from Lamb of God, Slayer, and Shadows Fall. His favorite drummers include Chris Adler (LoG), Gene Hoglan (Testament and Strapping Young Lad), and Dave Lombardo (Slayer). 

Jerod’s influences come from a range of punk and alternative to metalcore. Tool and Norma Jean are his favorite bands. He is also inspired a lot by bands such as August Burns Red, Parkway Drive, and Lamb of God

Johnny: How did you guys all meet and when did the idea of the band begin to take shape?

WD: Michael and Kelby grew up together and have founded/ been involved with different projects from cover bands to rock, and most recently have settled into the true metalcore sound as We Divide. Michael and Jacob went to college together where Jacob was recruited for a rock project in 2014 because of his ability with harsh vocals as well as good cleans. After a few member changes, including Jacob leaving and returning to the band, Jordan was added to the lineup in late 2017 as the drummer, finalizing the transition into metalcore and the establishment of We Divide. Our most recent addition was Jordan’s brother, Jerod, on bass. Although Jerod is a guitarist first, he’s been helping with the band for a while, so when the spot came open he bought a bass and jumped in!

Johnny: When and where was the first gig as We Divide? What do you remember from that gig that has stuck with you?

WD: Our first show as We Divide was at Phil Brady’s in Baton Rouge, LA in August of 2017. Our music was still evolving some at the time, and we had just brought back Jacob and added Jordan to drums a couple weeks before, and had just recently come up with the name. We were the only metalcore band on the lineup, headlining after a “garage rock” band and a “psychedelic country rock” band. We had a really small set at the time and as an out of town band had no intention of headlining, but that’s where they put us. In fact, we played so late that the bartender tried getting us off the stage like halfway through the set. I (Michael) remember looking at her, saying “okay,” then just finishing the set. We didn’t make any money and it was a bizarre lineup but we had fun, got a good reaction, and we realized that we had something really cool going. 

Johnny: What’s the story behind the name?

WD: We were trying to find a solid name that wasn’t too long or hard to remember and someone just said “We Divide” sounds cool. It’s concise and can be interpreted however, so we ran with it. 

Johnny: So you guys have a style that is most easily described as melodic metalcore with some apparent influences from bands such as As I Lay Dying, Demon Hunter, and Killswitch Engage to name a few. Was the choice to pursue that style conscious or was it the love of that genre what brought you together in the first place?

WD: All of us are huge metalcore fans of groups such as KSE and AILD and have been since we were teenagers. Kelby is definitely the more advanced guitarist, and as Michael was playing catch up in different techniques and scales, we realized that melodic metalcore was the best platform to hone our ability and also challenge one another to improve and innovate. We are always searching for a way to become heavier but also more technical and melodic. We came to a point in early 2018 that we had to have “a sound,” and narrowing our focus helped us a lot. After releasing our first EP, we have been thinking about ways to evolve, and have even started writing with 7 strings for our full length album that we’re working on. We think this second studio project will offer some new sounds and styles that we just didn’t have in our arsenal on the EP.

Johnny: There aren’t just a ton of venues in the area that will give real estate to a metalcore band. What have been some of the challenges you guys have encountered finding gigs in the area, and what’s the farthest you’ve had to travel for a gig so far?

WD: Our hotspot in East Texas has definitely been Clicks in Tyler. They accommodate all kinds of rock and metal which is really cool. It’s hard to find metal/metalcore lineups anywhere else so we have to go out of town. We’ve driven as far as Baton Rouge, Lafayette, and Houston for shows. We love to travel and meet new people though, so we have a lot of fun. We plan on playing in DFW soon and look forward to some new opportunities coming to Longview. 

Johnny: So I have to admit, the picture you guys present on stage and the sound that comes from the stage when you start performing is a little unexpected at first. Do you enjoy seeing the look on people’s faces when you’re at a new venue, or when you spot new people at venues you’ve previously played?

WD: We actually get that a lot: “Whoa! I didn’t expect you guys to sound like that!” I guess we’re pretty average looking guys, so it’s always funny when we hear that and we just take it as a compliment. We don’t plan on going out of our way to look “more metal” so I guess we’ll continue to bring that surprise. We just let our sound speak for itself and we have a lot of fun talking to people after the show.

Johnny: About how many shows are you guys playing a month now?

WD: We’re all pretty busy working full time, but we are trying to play at least one show a month. We’ve also been working on an album which is recorded in Fort Worth, as well as working with some different local radio shows/stations to get our sound out there. 

Johnny: You’ve done some studio work in the past and have some material out that sounds pretty phenomenal, both production-wise AND execution. Anything you took away from that experience that has served you well moving forward, and about how many originals do you currently have in the arsenal?

WD: Even though we played our first set in August of 2017 as We Divide, we actually kind of reset after dropping our first single in April 2018. We had some songs that didn’t really fit where we were heading. We realized this once we started working in the studio. The experience just molded our view and made us want to focus on music that was great. We didn’t want filler songs or music that didn’t represent who We Divide was going to be. Since then we have tracked a few more songs but we don’t add them to the set until they’re released. We’ve released and added one single after the EP, and will be adding a couple more this year before the album drops (early 2020). Right now we have a 6 song set lined up plus some intros and occasionally a breakdown encore to finish a set. We hope to add a cover song in the future but we focus on original music. 

Johnny: Speaking of moving forward, what is coming up on the horizon that you guys are looking forward to?

WD: We are dropping a single and accompanying music video on September 6th. It’s our first music video so we are really excited about it. We have some more tracking to do, but we are working hard to have a full album release in early 2020. Our sound is definitely evolving so we look forward to improving our set and bringing something fresh to our listeners.

Johnny: Individually, what’s your favorite original that you perform?

WD: Michael – Antitype; Kelby – Antitype; Jacob – Buried; Jordan – Solidarity; Jerod – Buried or Solidarity.

Johnny: Okay, try to describe for someone coming to their first WD show what they’re in for?

WD: We are a melodic metalcore band, so definitely expect a lot of heavy vocals, good melodies, harmonized guitars, pretty singing, and of course big breakdowns. We think our music is pretty high energy and a lot of fun, so even people who don’t listen to much metal can enjoy it. Lyrics and stage presence are clean so our music is safe for all ages. We have fun, we don’t take things too seriously, and we try to put on a good show.

Find We Divide at facebook.com/WeDivide/.

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