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Matthew Marcus McDaniel: Feel Free To Express Yourself

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By Johnny Griffith

Sometimes you just have to throw caution to the wind and go with what you feel. That’s the approach local East Texan Matthew McDaniel takes when it comes to writing his music. After spending a lifetime immersed in music, McDaniel has learned to let the music lead and be an expression of what he’s feeling in the time and the place it decides to flow. A frequent stage presence around the area, Matthew wears a couple of different hats; He has a consistent and dynamic solo show, which we’ll focus on today, and he sits in as lead singer for a local band as well.

I managed to get Matthew to take a break and so that we could get to know him and his work a little better.

Johnny: When were you first drawn to music?

Matthew: My first memory and comprehension of my existence have music, I learned to stand and walk by pulling myself up on the shelving unit that held my family’s stereo system. I was bouncing and dancing to the music – Michael Jackson and Earth Wind & Fire LPs mostly.

Johnny: What were some of your influences early on that shaped your musical direction?

Matthew: I could list dozens but for time’s sake, when I was in my last year of college at the University of Texas in Austin, Cross Canadian Ragweed, Reckless Kelly and two dozen more were hot. They got me into wanting to play and write music. Not too long after beginning to play an instrument and perform my rock ‘n roll influences from The Black Crowes to Tom Petty started to come out in my writing. From there, I dove headfirst into The Doors, Rolling Stones, Little Feat, Ben Harper, and Aerosmith. I have written since I was young starting at around 7 or 8, writing about what I know, how I felt, places I had traveled (I traveled with my family across country in the summers starting at the age of 7). I had many influences outside of music, books, TV, films, art, travel, and relationships. The full spectrum of my life added to my writing from the time I was young until this day.

Johnny: How would you describe your music now and how has it evolved over the years?

Matthew: I like to think of my music as a free space, ‘Music that you can feel’. I am sure people have and will always have, their own opinions about what it is or should be labeled as I don’t write any song with an intention other than the way I feel about it when I am writing it. Even then, it may not end up sounding like what I thought especially after I play it a thousand times. It can become something completely different when I record it. I would say as far as an evolutionary process, I started with three chords and the true philosophy because of the music that launched me and the music I was around, I think simplicity is a huge stepping stone for many, if not most. Now I like to start with a melody or riff or a lyrical concept and build from there. Sometimes I still end with a simple result that can sometimes become very complex. What it all boils down to is what I feel from the song. Having no agenda has been the best policy for me in recent years.

Johnny: Are you primarily a solo act or do you collaborate with other musicians regularly?

Matthew: I have two main projects in my life: my solo acoustic act of Matthew Marcus McDaniel, and my “Rock & Roll” band Thieves of Sunrise. When writing over the years, I have collaborated with other writers and performers but it is usually for a commissioned project or for fun with friends. The songs that I produce as a representation of myself or band are written by myself and musically with any bandmates I may have at the time. In my early years, I collaborated a few times with friends mostly and it was a good way to get started.

Johnny: How much original music do you typically try to work into a set?

Matthew: That is usually dependent on where I am playing and what project I am performing with. A Thieves of Sunrise show will be 95-100% original material depending on the length of the show. My Matthew Marcus McDaniel shows right now are about 50-60% original material unless a venue requests that I play mostly covers. Some nights you have to pay the bills and the venue is the boss. On nights where the shows are short or it is a listening room or showcase, that audience will get 100% original show. I also, at times, try not to play a lot of Thieves of Sunrise. I have lots of material and if I am constantly using a hefty portion of our catalog. It feels like I not doing myself justice as far as my other songs and differentiating my solo act from the band. I do have a lot of crossover material with the band though and I play those nightly. This also lends itself to making sure that I stay on top of writing material strictly for myself and different from my other endeavors.

Johnny: Do you typically play in the immediate vicinity or do you get the opportunity to travel?

Matthew: Most of my solo work in a given month will keep me in Texas and Eastern Oklahoma. In the past, I have rarely traveled outside of Texas for my solo work, but now my region has spread to include Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, New Mexico, Colorado. I will be traveling further as a solo act in the future and have been venturing out to Oregon and Washington in recent months.

Johnny: What are some of the challenges of balancing the passion for music with the responsibilities of being an “adult”?

Matthew: I think at some point if you are not one of the chosen few to hit the big time in your early years you must begin to look at what you do as a business. It is the only way to stay afloat if you want to be a full-time musician. You will also most likely have to diversify your skill set. Learn to save money no matter how little you might be making. It is definitely constant work. That is where the trouble comes in, in your question lies some of the answers – you have to learn balance. There is no silver bullet. Find a schedule that works for you and keep working, the time you allow yourself to write and the time you are performing are your time for passion so take full advantage and indulge, soak up every possible second of it.

Johnny: What have been some of your best memories on stage? Offstage?

Matthew: The best memories are when you know that you have gotten through to your audience whether or not they were there for you or you had to win them. Its when people understand what you do and why you are doing it. I have always approached music from the standpoint of helping others, giving people the most positive and enriching experience possible. I write the songs from what I gather from the universe and the world around me and what I put out is for others. When I see people engaged and happy that is the best. The rest of what may or may not happen on stage is a result of the people. Offstage is about travel, seeing new places, eating different food, life experience. Meeting fans and hearing how the music made them feel, hearing about their lives, that just like on stage, is a big one.

Johnny: What have you been most proud of in your musical career to this point?

Matthew: That I have been able to sustain essentially as an independent and full-time musician for almost my entire career. I am still out here, still moving, and I am still full of music. Also the fact I have never had to sacrifice my art or bend to what others thought might be a more popular route. The people I have met, the places I have been, and all of the music I have made are what keeps me going. You won’t hear a lot of my music on the radio and you probably won’t see me walking across too many stages to accept awards but I will keep making music for the people and life will take care of the rest.

Johnny: What do you have in store for the rest of 2018 and looking forward to 2019?

Matthew: For the rest of 2018 I am almost booked up completely. I’m working on solidifying a short tour up to the Rocky Mountains in December. Thieves of Sunrise has a new album that has recently come out called “Let the Truth Speak.” I am really excited about that. Also in December, I am considering beginning work on a new solo Matthew Marcus McDaniel album since it’s been a while since I put one of those out. In 2019, Thieves of Sunrise will be back in full swing, so that will take a great deal of my time. Last, but not least, I am hoping to start on two new projects based out on the West Coast / Pacific Northwest, a west coast style psychedelic project and an acoustic folk duo.

You can follow Matthew McDaniel online at facebook.com/MatthewMarcusMcDaniel and matthewmarcusmcdaniel.com.

Bands

Not Waiting On The World To Change: Patrick Lissner

Patrick Lissner On Stage

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By Johnny Griffith

Some people are content to go through life with blinders on to what happens around them. Sometimes it’s because we get so caught up in our own individual stories that we just don’t stop to notice what is going on with our neighbors. Other times it’s an intentional choice to wait for someone else to fix the problem. One East Texan, Patrick Lissner, and his family have decided to stop waiting, but rather use their talents and resources to change the world one action at a time. 

A transplant to the Tyler area, Patrick has been attracted to music his entire life and started singing at an early age. He can be found on stages locally and has decided to use that platform to spread a message of positivity and change. We sat down with him this month to get to know him better.

Johnny: You’ve got a really interesting story, Patrick. how about giving a bit of your background on how you got to Tyler?

Patrick: I am German-American. I was born in Bremen, Germany, lived there until I was about 4 ½ , grew up speaking German and English at the same time, and I am still fluent in German today. My family was in the horse-trading industry in the 70’s, buying horses from a ranch in between Big Sandy and Gilmer, TX, about 1,000 acres total. We eventually bought the ranch and that is where I grew up. It was a boy’s paradise, romping around the land without a care in the world. I went to school from K-12 at Big Sandy ISD, then the family sold the ranch in 2001 and I subsequently moved to Tyler. I attended TJC and eventually graduated from UT Tyler with a Communication/Marketing degree. 

I met my wife at TJC and we started dating in 2003. We got married in 2005 and now have four children, Zoe 11, Ava 9, Maximus 7, and Gabriella 8 months. 

We own Moss – ”Where Flowers are Fair.” We started the business in 2012 in hopes to bring conscious consumerism to East Texas. “Where Flowers are Fair” is a reference to Fair Trade. Less than 3% of flowers imported into the U.S. are fairly traded, so my wife works extra hard to source her flowers ethically from either local growers or growers who are fair trade or ethically sourced. A portion of purchases at her store goes directly to help support For the Silent, an anti-human trafficking organization right here in Tyler, TX. 

We are passionate about using our gifts and talents to leave this world a better place than we found it, making as many friends as we can along the way. I turn 37 this October, but I’ve lived a lot of life and feel I have a lot of stories to tell. I try to unleash 110% of my passion in the songs I sing and how I perform on stage. I hope it leaves people wondering what will be next. 

Johnny: When and how did you first get interested in music?

Patrick: I’ve been singing since I was 3 years old. My Dad was a huge Neil Diamond fan. We used to have this VHS tape of me in my Huggies, with my Dad’s sunglasses on holding a TV remote as a microphone singing, “Coming to America”. Music has always been my peace and my escape. I often joke and say, “It’s cheaper than therapy” which I believe is true. 

Johnny: Did you have any early mentors that really pushed you or inspired you to stay with it?

Patrick: Yes, my elementary music teacher, Mrs. Eckeberger, was always so encouraging, I sang in the school show choir – yes, you heard that correctly. We went to show choir competitions. I won Best Male Vocalist in our choir. She always pushed me to be a better singer and encouraged me along the way. 

In high school I had a youth director tell me my talent had no bounds and that I was going to do something big with music one day. That stuck with me and made me all the more passionate about pursuing music. 

Johnny: When did you really start thinking about music being more than a hobby?

Patrick: Always. Seriously, music has never been a “hobby” for me; I’ve always taken it seriously, but with passion and a desire to have fun every single time I play. 

Johnny: What have been some of the challenges you’ve experienced trying to realize music as a livelihood?

Patrick: Finding my voice and sound. It is easy to emulate others, and I do that from time to time with covers and it’s fun, but I always try to put my “twist” or interpretation on the song. But I think a lot of musicians, myself included, needed to be told early on: Be yourself, there is only one of you, sing with your voice, play your style, embrace it. 

Johnny: Who were your early influences, musically?

Patrick: Dave Matthews Band, Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen, Nick Drake, Black Crowes, 90s grunge rock. 

Johnny: How would you describe your music?

Patrick: You get what you see/hear. I like to sing every note as if it were my last. There is a lot of sweat, awkward dancing (by me) but a full-throttle sound. We are folk-rock/Americana, but we like to surprise you with other influences too. 

Johnny: How much of the music you perform is original versus cover songs?

Patrick: I’d say it varies, depending on how long the set is, but can vary between half original and half cover to ¾ cover and ¼ original, just depends on the gig and if its a solo or full-band gig.

Johnny: I like to ask all the musicians I interview what their most memorable gig has been so far, so what’s yours?

Patrick: I’d say last fall – It was raining cats and dogs, nothing we could do about it, we were playing at True Vine, a full band show, we had an amazing rehearsal and were ready to bring it, and then the rain came. First thought was well, we play the same for 5 or 500 … 500 didn’t show, but we had around 200 + folks show up in the rain, singing along to the covers and soaking in the originals – it was a lively crowd. I always love the unexpected goodness that happens from time to time.

Johnny: What’s the farthest you’ve traveled to play a show so far?

Patrick: Wisconsin. Granted at the time I was living there, but for a Texas boy, it was a different crowd. 

Johnny: Are you just primarily a solo act, or do you ever collaborate with other musicians?

Patrick: Primarily full band, drums, guitar, violin, bassist, lead player. Would love to add some keys to the band eventually. 

Johnny: East Texas is known for having an embarrassment of riches when it comes to musicians. What do you feel makes this area just a little different from everywhere else?

Patrick: I think East Texas truly has a mentality of, “we can do anything.” Not in some narcissistic way, but we will try and if at first, we don’t succeed we will try again. We are resilient. Most ETX folk are kind-hearted and will give you the shirt off their back. I think we have a lot of stories to tell and it comes out in music.

Johnny: What’s on the immediate horizon musically for you?

Patrick: I’m looking to produce a 6 song EP. We’ve got the single “Breathe Easy” which is a song I recently wrote about watching my Dad fight, and eventually lose, a battle with cancer – he passed in January – and the birth of my daughter, who was born December 3. It talks about the chaos of life, the ebbs, and flows of goodness and bitterness, and the fact that we can all “Breathe Easy” and not take ourselves so seriously. Kindness is free, and if we live in it, it’s easy to give to others.

Follow Patrick at facebook.com/plissnermusic.

 

 

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Summer Days: Bob Mauldin

Bob Mauldin's New Album, Summer Days

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By Johnny Griffith

Bob Mauldin is a man of many hats. The East Texas native has taken on many roles since his childhood days in Van Zandt County. Over the years Bob has been a radio DJ, television host, producer, and media specialist to name a few, but the one thing he would say he’s always been is a musician. Growing up playing outdoors in the Colfax community, Mauldin cultivated a love of the country, spending most of his time outside until discovering music in his early teens. Once bitten by the bug, Bob created a little “studio” space in his bedroom and devoted most of his spare time to developing his talent and creating music, which would plant the seeds that would eventually grow into his passion. 

Fast forward several years and Bob has just released his latest album “Summer Days,” and is currently booking dates in support of the release. We caught up to Bob to get more of his story and some insight into the new recording:

Johnny: You’ve been known around East Texas for years as a radio personality. How did you originally get started on that path?

Bob: When I was a teenager in the little home studio, I would make tapes for my friends of me hosting “radio shows” where I played records and introduced the artists. From one of those tapes, I got my first real radio job at a little AM station in Canton at the age of 16. Soon I decided to try my hand at full-time radio in Tyler. Surprisingly, I got a job at 101.5 KNUE and went on from there, hosting several radio shows over the years.

Johnny: You’ve got to have thousands of memories from that era but is there anything that stands out as particularly cool?

Bob: I had the opportunity to meet and work with stars, many of them before they were household names. Back when Keith Urban was just getting started as a solo artist, I attended a showcase of his in San Diego. I remember at the dinner where we were supposed to get acquainted with him, several of the other DJs and I were starstruck by Marion Ross (the mom from Happy Days) eating at the table right behind us. She had consumed a few glasses of wine that night, so she was in a great mood and very happy to take pictures with us. Most of the radio folks had completely ignored Keith until the night of his showcase performance, where he blew us away with a show in a little club there. After that, he took off. 

My favorite young artist was Kacey Musgraves. I used to coordinate and host talent shows around East Texas for various promoters. I always loved to hear Kacey on those shows, especially when she started writing her own stuff. I would play her songs on the air because I liked them, and back then we had the freedom to share music we thought was good. I remember wishing that the judges on those shows would pay attention to Kacey’s writing ability because it always seemed that some girl belting out some vocally acrobatic song would always win the contests. So I feel like the success that Kacey has had recently is far overdue and very well deserved. If you ever find a CD entitled “Wanted: One Good Cowboy,” GET IT! Some of Kacey’s earliest writing.

Johnny: How did you transition from radio to television to being the host of Expedition Texas? How many episodes have you produced of that now? 

Bob: Radio changed a lot over the years and after it dried up for me, I found myself doing PR work and focusing a lot more on music. I was playing music quite a bit, I had a band and we were working at least two or three shows a month. Then, I had the idea for Expedition Texas. I had just produced a short film and still had the equipment from that. I had worked in TV part-time before and knew how to create a show. I shot a pilot for Expedition Texas and quickly found interest from TV stations. I told my band, “Go home and I’ll call you if I need you”…I never did call! I began producing and hosting Expedition Texas in 2012 and I’ve been working on it ever since. Just guessing, I’d say there are at least 40 unique episodes. 

Johnny: Okay let’s switch gears and get to the music. When did you first develop an interest in playing/performing music?

Bob: It started at a very early age. As a very small child, my parents tell me I’d climb up on a table or a stool and sing for people at gatherings. As a teenager, I was interested in writing songs mostly. The performing part grew out of that but didn’t really switch into high gear until I started getting some airplay on some of my songs. 

Johnny: Who were some of your early influences?

 Bob: Early on it was the country-rock music of Michael Nesmith. If you’re not familiar, look up his early 70’s work with The First National Band. This was after he left The Monkees – he was back to being a starving artist, and he was creating music that he wanted to create. 

Johnny: When was the point you kind of stepped back and said: “Hey, I think I’m decent enough to do this as more than just a hobby?”

Bob: I was playing a show with another band and was performing my song, “Baby”. It was the first song of mine to get decent airplay, so I had started singing it in public. At this one particular show, I looked down at the front row and there was a group of people singing along with every word. It was very flattering and certainly lit a fire under me to take it to the next level and put together my own band.

Johnny: Was country always what appealed to you the most or did you play around with a few other styles in your formative years?

Bob: I grew up on country music. I’m pretty much “country” through and through. I’ve often told people that even if I suddenly joined a metal band they’d probably end up sounding country. I just can’t help it. It’s who I am and it shows in every note I sing.

Johnny: What have been some of the challenges over the years with juggling radio/tv/music/family?

Bob: Time! My interest shifts so much. Sometimes I think I wear my loved ones out with constant new ideas and new ventures, but I stay true to the ones that earn a living for my family. I keep a day job. I focus a huge amount of attention on Expedition Texas and that will never change. I’ve been very blessed to be able to dabble in all the fields that interest me.

Johnny: You just released a new album “Summer Days” on June 3rd. Where did you work on the album and how has the process for you evolved since your first foray into recording several years ago?

Bob: I’ve recorded music for a long time. I had several small releases before Van Zandt County Line in 2011. That album was promoted to Texas radio and we had some success with it. It was very much following a formula that worked for other artists. Summer Days are different. I recorded all original songs that I wrote. I had complete control of every aspect of the album. It led me to express things more deeply and in a way that I feel is more “me.” Since I’m a little weird, so is this album, but these are the most honest, personal songs I’ve ever written. So it’s something I’m very proud of.

Johnny: What was the inspiration behind the new album?

Bob: Life. Every song comes from some experience I’ve either had personally or been close to over the last 10-20 years. There are songs on this album that were completed even before the last album in 2011, but because of how personal they were, I left them out of that project. Every song on Summer Days is real. If I didn’t live the experience personally, I at least witnessed it, and I share those stories on this album.

Johnny: Any songs that just grab more of you than the others on “Summer Days?”

Bob: Out of Time is significant. I’m sure people will listen to that and think, “What’s wrong with you, dude?”

I actually had the idea for that song in a dream, but never did much with it because it seems so negative…but then I had an uncle who was on his deathbed and facing the end of his life. He did it with such courage and really focused on making his last days pleasant. I ended up reworking the song with my wife and recording it just in time for the album. Out of Time ended up being my favorite song on the album and it’s dedicated to the memory of my uncle Lennie Hale, Jr. who passed away the night I recorded the vocals for the song.

Johnny: How has the reception been so far? 

Bob: It’s been great. I’ve been kind of just getting my toes wet with performing again and I’ve been really busy with media. So far, folks have said nice things about the album, even though radio doesn’t really know what to do with it. I’m happy that people are actually listening to it.

Johnny: You’ve put together a new band to tour in support of the album. Who are you sharing the stage with?

Bob: For all our upcoming shows, I’m working with JD Moss on Guitar, Kevin Durrant on Drums and Perry Thompson on bass.

Johnny: What can a first-time fan expect at a Bob Mauldin show?

Bob: It’s super laid back. I do play a lot of my songs, but after spending so much of my life as a country DJ, we do drop in some fun old country songs! 

Johnny: Any upcoming shows on the radar that have you excited? 

Bob: Camp Street Cafe in Crockett is going to be a fun one. It’s a historic place and a comfortable, relaxed setting! Also, in October, we’re booked close to home in Lindale at Texas Music City!

Johnny: What does the rest of 2019 look like and any new projects on the horizon?

Bob: In August, we begin shooting our fall season of Expedition Texas. We were picked up by Heartland TV Network this spring, so it’s going to be our first new season nationwide! I’ll be playing some dates as time allows, but I want to encourage everyone to pick up the new album on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, and everywhere else music is sold. As an artist, it would make my year to have everyone hear and enjoy this music!

Follow Bob Mauldin at facebook.com/bobmauldinmusic and bobmauldin.com.

 

 

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It’s Only Rock & Roll But I Like It: Post Profit

East Texas Rockers Post Profit

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By Johnny Griffith

One of the perks of this gig is getting to listen to a lot of really good music from some fantastic musicians as I prep for these interviews. It’s always fun to catch someone early on and watch them as they develop, grow their catalog and fan base, and a few of that break out from behind the pine curtain to go on to develop fans in other regions. This month I get to interview some guys who’ve actually been on my radar for several months now: Post Profit.

Post Profit is a Longview based band made up of Matt Jackson and Nick Hawner on guitars and vocals, Zack Hicks on drums, with Jordan Conley on bass guitar, and these guys are really, really good. Playing loud and energetic, they have a big modern rock sound that keeps you engaged, grabs you and won’t let you go. With some significant shows under their belt and a growing list of originals for their loyal fans, Post Profit is poised to be the next band from this area to gain traction in places like Dallas and Austin. We sat down with them this month to get to know them a little better:

Johnny: How did you all individually get started in music? 

Matt: I started out with my dad showing me rock music at a very young age. I was inspired by him to start playing guitar. He showed me a few chords on the guitar when I was 3 years old, and I took it and ran with it. I locked myself up in my room through most of high school playing guitar. In 6th grade, I joined the marching band and played the snare drum on the drumline. In 2008 I joined my first band which was called United Glory, where I played guitar and sang. That band is what helped me sort of learn how to become a frontman!

Nick: My Mom has exposed me to great music all of my life. She tried to learn guitar when I was about 4 or 5 years old and when she gave it up, I adopted her 1979 Les Paul as my own. When I was 7, my parents bought me a drumset, and in 6th grade, I joined the marching band and played on the drumline. In high school, I would go to shows where Matt was playing and really got inspired to join a band. In 2014 I joined a band called Twenty West and started playing shows and playing solo on the side. Once I met Zach and was reconnected to Matt, Twenty West broke up and Post Profit was born.

Jordan: I started playing keyboard when I was about 6 years old, and I learned melodies and notes by ear. I joined marching band in 6th grade and played saxophone which I picked up really fast. In 8th grade, I was first chair in the high school marching band. I really enjoyed the band through high school, and when I started college I got my first guitar. I started keys and then switched to playing bass in our youth praise band when I was a junior in high school. I eventually joined the college marching band and the music program, graduating with my associate’s degree. I met Matt in some of my classes in college.

Zach: My uncle played drums and had a drum set at his house. I started playing them when I was about 2-3 years old. I got my own set when I was 4 years old and I started playing drums in church when I was 11. I joined marching band in 6th grade and played trombone at first, then went to drumline. I was put in the high school marching band in 7th grade and played the snare drum. In 2012 I fronted my first band called Zodiac Braves. I took a few years hiatus after Zodiac Braves, then formed Post Profit with Nick and Matt, and the rest is history.

Johnny: How did you guys meet? 

Post: Matt and Zach have known each other most of their lives, and Nick starting doing open jams with them when they met through an ex-girlfriend. Those open jams turned into us having a few solid songs we would always play. Then those songs turned into a setlist that we would practice pretty much every day. We formed a band and started booking shows! Jordan would come to almost all of our shows and eventually became our bass player!

Johnny: What about the name? What is the significance behind the name Post Profit and how was that born?

Post: Post Profit is kind of a play on words. It has many meanings depending on how you think about it. The word “Profit” could be interpreted as “Prophet”. Or it could mean “after the money”. It’s ultimately up to the listener to decide what it means to them. 

Johnny: When and where was the first Post Profit show?

Post: Our first real show outside of a jam was Halloween 2017 at a venue called 9muses in Tyler, TX

Johnny: How would you describe your typical show to someone who hasn’t seen you guys?

Post: Energetic, engaging, loud, and unforgettable. 

Johnny: How many originals do you have at this point?

Post: We are currently wrapping up our EP which will have about 6 original songs on it.

Johnny: When I listen to your originals, I hear threads of lots of bands I enjoy: Breaking Benjamin, Rage Against The Machine, Foo Fighters, maybe some Muse in there as well with a big sound, great vocals, and great guitars. But that’s what I hear…how would you describe your sound and your biggest influences?

Post: That’s about right! We are going for a modern alternative sound. Something that’s familiar yet has a new edge to it. Some of our favorite bands include Foo Fighters, Nothing But Thieves, Thrice, Radiohead, Deftones, Incubus, Citizen, Highly Suspect, Red Fang, Royal Blood. 

Johnny: If I’m correct, Post Profit has a couple of singles and accompanying videos you’ve recorded. Anything you learned from that process that’s helped you grow as a band?

Post: We just recently finished filming our first “real” music video. It is a surreal process, to be honest. We learned not to take ourselves so seriously, you know? We are a goofy group of guys that love to have fun, and we want to show our fun side to people. Whether it’s making a video or playing a show, we know that our energy can translate to the audience. If we are having the time of our lives, it’s easier for our audience to cut loose and enjoy themselves in the same way. It’s all about bouncing good energy back and forth. 

Johnny: Post Profit does some killer covers in addition to your original stuff that is really all over the spectrum, from Post Malone to Chris Stapleton. What are the individual favorite covers that you do?

Post: Some of our favorite covers would be “I’m Not Made By Design” by Nothing But Thieves, “Out of the Black” by Royal Blood, “Seratonia” by Highly Suspect, and “Man of Constant Sorrow” by the Soggy Bottom Boys.

Johnny: About how many shows a month are you booking?

Post: Usually between 8-12 shows per month.

Johnny: What’s the farthest you’ve traveled for a show to this point?

Post: The farthest show Post Profit has played from home was about 4 hours away in the Galveston area. 

Johnny: You have had some pretty cool opportunities in the last two years for some amazing shows. What would you say the most memorable has been so far?

Post: Some of the coolest things we have done would include opening for Filter at the last InkLife Tour, opening for Drowning Pool and getting to meet and become good friends with another band called To Whom It May, playing the So What Music Festival in Houston TX, and opening up for Picturesque in Deep Ellum.

Johnny: What are some “must-see” shows coming up for the band the rest of the year?

Post: Definitely Downtown Live in our hometown of Longview, TX, August 2nd, 2019. We are opening for A Killer’s Confession at Clicks Live in Tyler, TX, August 16th, 2019. Post Profit is also very excited to announce we will be playing in Downtown Tyler on the Square, November 8th, 2019 for UT Tyler Patriot Nights.

Follow Post Profit at.facebook.com/postprofitofficial.

 

 

 

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